Maheshkhali is an Upazila of Cox's Bazar District in the Division of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Maheshkhali Upazila (cox's bazar district) with an area of 362.18 km2, is bounded by Chakaria upazila on the north, Cox's bazar sadar upazila and the Bay of Bengal on the south, Chakaria and Cox's Bazar sadar upazilas on the east, Kutubdia upazila and the Bay of Bengal on the west. The eastern part of the upazila is separated from the mainland by the Maheshkhali channel. Main rivers are Bakkhali and Maheshkhali channel. Administration Maheshkhali thana was turned into an upazila in 1982. It consists of 7 union parishads, 25 mouzas and 170 villages. Maheshkhali (Town) consists of 1 mouza with an area of 2.93 km2. It has a population of 13519; male 54.54%, female 45.46%. The density of population per km2 is 4614. Literacy rate among the town people is 30.9%.Adinath Temple, a temple of Shiva, and a Buddhist pagoda are also located on this island.

St. Martin's Island is a small island (area only 8 sq. km) in the northeastern part of the Bay of Bengal, about 9 km south of the tip of the Cox's Bazar-Teknaf peninsula, and forming the southernmost part of Bangladesh. It is about 8 km west of the northwest coast of Myanmar, at the mouth of the Naf River. 1st settlement started just 250 years ago by some Arabian Sailors and named as ‘Zajira’. During British occupation the island was named as St. Martin Island. The local name of the island is "Narical Gingira", also spelled "Narikel Jinjira/Jinjera", means 'Coconut Island' in Bengali. It is the only coral island in Bangladesh.

Inhabitants: Most of the island's 5500 inhabitants live primarily from fishing. Besides, the other staple crops are rice and coconut. Being very common in the island, Algae is collected, then dried and finally exported to Myanmar. Between October and April, the fishermen from neighbouring areas bring their caught fishes to the island's temporary wholesale market. As the centre and the south are mainly farmland and makeshift huts, most of the strenuous things are around the far north of the island.

Transportation: Do not expect to find taxis, tarred roads or electricity here. Except for the larger hotels that run on generators, there is no electricity supply from National grid in the island. The island is all about sun, sea and palm trees. During the day, the island comes alive with water and beach sports, with beach parties and bonfires lighting up the evening skies.

Tourism: St. Martin's Island has become a popular tourist spot. Currently, five shipping liners run daily trips to the island, including Shahid Sher Niabat, L T Kutubdia, Eagle, Keary Cruise & Dine and Keary-Sindbad. Tourists can book their trip either from Chittagong
or from Cox's Bazar. The surrounding coral reef of the island has an extension named Chera Dwip. A small bush is there, which is the only green part of Chera Dwip, enhancing the beauty of this island. People do not live on this part of the island, so it is advisable

for the tourists to go there early and come back by afternoon. In the past 5 years St. Martin's visitor population has increased dramatically. While this situation has proven to be lucrative for the islanders, it is causing the natural beauty of the island to deteriorate. Presently there are many efforts being put forth to preserve the several endangered species of turtles that nest on the island, as well as the corals, some of which are found only on Narikel Jinjera. Pieces of the coral reef are being removed in order to be sold to tourists.Nesting turtles are sometimes taken for food, and their hatchlings are often distracted by the twinkling lights along the beach. Species of fish, a few just recently discovered, are being overfished. Every year the fishermen must venture further out to sea to get their catch. Most of them use motorless boats. It's possible to walk around the island in a day because it measures only 8 km2 (3 sq. mile), shrinking to about 5 km2 (2 sq. mi) during high tide. The island exists only because of its coral base, so removal of that coral risks erosion of the beaches. Sadly, St. Martin's has lost roughly 25% of its coral reef in the past 7 years.

 

Cox's Bazar is a town, a fishing port and district headquarters in Bangladesh. It is known for its wide sandy beach which is the world's longest natural sandy sea beach. It is an unbroken 125 km sandy sea beach with a gentle slope. It is located 150 km south of the industrial port Chittagong. Cox’s Bazar is also known by the name "Panowa," the literal translation of which means "yellow flower." Its other old name was "Palongkee." The modern Cox's Bazar derives its name from Captain Hiram Cox (died 1799), an officer serving in British India. An officer of the British East India Company, Captain Cox was appointed Superintendent of Palongkee outpost after Warren Hastings became Governor of Bengal. Captain Cox was specially mobilised to deal with a century-long conflict between Arakan refugees and local Rakhains. The Captain was a compassionate soul and the plight of the people touched his heart. He embarked upon the mammoth task of rehabilitating refugees in the area and made significant progress. A premature death took Captain Cox in 1799 before he could finish his work. But the work he had done earned him a place in the hearts of the locals, and to commemorate his role in rehabilitation work a market was established and named after him Cox's Bazar ("Cox's Market").

Cox's Bazar is one of the most-visited tourist destinations in Bangladesh, however it has yet to become a major international tourist destination, with no international hotel chains operating here, due to lack of publicity and transportation.

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